Tag Archives: White River

Man swept away in Lake Taneycomo still missing

25 May
Written by Cliff Sain – News-Leader

A man who was swept away after falling into Lake Taneycomo is still missing according to an emergency official.

“He is still unaccounted for,” said Western Taney County Fire Protection District Assistant Chief Bruce Bjorne. “We have no reason to believe the individual came out of the water on his own.”

According to Western Taney County Fire Protection District Assistant Chief Bruce Bjorne, the unidentified man was trapped on a steep embankment above the lake just off Acacia Club Road and Lowell Road, near Hollister and just upstream from College of the Ozarks, before he went into the water.

Bjorne said firefighters were called at about 7:30 a.m. to assist Taney County deputies in retrieving the person who was apparently calling out that he was injured.

Taney County Sheriff Jimmie Russell said they were called to the scene by a resident.

He said the homeowner discovered the man inside the homeowner’s car.

“He took off when he was seen and he went over the embankment,” Russell said.

The entire embankment rises about 200 feet above Lake Taneycomo, Bjorne said. It was not clear how far down the embankment the man was when firefighters arrived to assist.

FLASH FLOOD WATCH NOW IN EFFECT THROUGH SUNDAY MORNING…

21 May

A flash flood watch for Southwest Missouri is now extended through Sunday morning because of all the rain from Friday.  A meterologist with the National Weather Service says 1 to 2 1/2 inches of rain fell across the area.  The runoff will cause rivers, creeks and streams to rise.  Folks downstream from Table Rock and Beaver Lakes could see more water as the Army Corps of Engineers may release the excess.  Expect the rain to stick with us.  There’s a daily chance of showers and thunderstorms through the middle of next week.

THE FLASH FLOOD WATCH IS NOW IN EFFECT FOR

* PORTIONS OF SOUTHEAST KANSAS AND MISSOURI…INCLUDING THE FOLLOWING AREAS…

IN SOUTHEAST KANSAS…BOURBON…CHEROKEE AND CRAWFORD.

IN MISSOURI…BARRY…BARTON…BENTON…
CAMDEN…CEDAR…CHRISTIAN…DADE…DALLAS…DENT…DOUGLAS…GREENE…HICKORY…HOWELL…JASPER…LACLEDE…LAWRENCE…MARIES…MCDONALD…MILLER…MORGAN…NEWTON…OREGON…
OZARK…PHELPS…POLK…PULASKI…SHANNON…ST. CLAIR…STONE…TANEY…TEXAS…VERNON…WEBSTER AND WRIGHT.

* THROUGH SUNDAY MORNING.

* ADDITIONAL RAINFALL WILL BE POSSIBLE FROM LATE THIS AFTERNOON AND TONIGHT AS MORE THUNDERSTORMS MOVE ACROSS THE AREA. HEAVY RAINFALL ON ALREADY SATURATED SOIL COULD LEAD TO FLASH FLOODINGAS WELL AS RIVER FLOODING.

* LOW LYING AREAS NEAR CREEKS AND STREAMS AND LOW WATER CROSSINGS WILL BE ESPECIALLY SUSCEPTIBLE TO FLASH FLOODING.

THOSE CAMPING OR FLOATING ON AREA RIVERS SHOULD CLOSELY MONITOR RIVER LEVELS AND BE PREPARED TO SEEK HIGHER GROUND.

THE ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS ANNOUNCED THAT RELEASES FROM BEAVER AND TABLE ROCK LAKES MAY BE INCREASED AS A RESULT OF ADDITIONAL HEAVY RAINFALL. THOSE DOWN STREAM FROM THESE DAMS INCLUDING LAKE TANEYCOMO SHOULD BE PREPARED TO TAKE PROPER ACTION IF INCREASED RELEASES ARE REQUIRED.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

A FLASH FLOOD WATCH MEANS THAT CONDITIONS MAY DEVELOP THAT LEAD TO FLASH FLOODING. FLASH FLOODING IS A VERY DANGEROUS SITUATION.

YOU SHOULD MONITOR LATER FORECASTS AND BE PREPARED TO TAKE ACTION SHOULD FLASH FLOOD WARNINGS BE ISSUED.

James River Flood Photos

1 May

We would love to see the photos you gathered during the 2011 flood.

Compared to the flood of 2008

New company serves up Float Trip Pickles

19 Apr

Carving its way through the Missouri Ozark Mountains is the spring fed and crystal clear, North Fork River.

In 1992 my brother and I took our father, Jerry Sr., to the North Fork for his first float trip.  The “float trip” became an annual ritual for “Senior” and five others.  Over the years, we have enjoyed the timeless beauty of the river, the thrill of jumping into Rainbow Spring and shooting the rapids, and the great times spent with family and friends.  The float trip has included many other rituals such as, Senior insisting on a red canoe, frosty beverages, fireworks, grilling of fine steaks a/k/a “the good meat”, and a gallon of the “float trip pickles”. (more)

Float Trip Pickles website.

Basics of Catching Ozarks Fish

3 Mar

Spending time on the James River doesn’t make me an expert. It does give me some insight in how to tackle situations in regards to catching fish. Here in The Ozark’s you might not catch a whopper but you will catch a great view of The Ozark’s from the front of the boat. I have taken folks fishing who have just moved to The Ozark’s and have literally no experience outdoors, that doesn’t make them any less “pumped” about going. They remind me of my kids when they were young and full of excitement about the next day’s trip, so much they couldn’t sleep. On the way down to the river in the truck they were sawing logs the entire way.

They asked a millions questions, always thinking I had the answers. Unfortunately, there are no magical, easy answers when it comes to catching fish. I learned through the years that the experts were a dime a dozen. I like to keep it simple especially when teaching kids. I explained to them that they have to learn the basics of fishing… current, depth, shade and casting.

Largemouth Bass Painting by Ralph Martens

The James River and it’s feeder creeks are engineered in two ways eddy’s and shoals. However no two are seemingly ever the same. Year in and year out they change, so you have to learn to read the water. Flooding makes the river structure shift, change or disappear so the log you saw last fall might be completely gone the following spring. Most fish like to hold in the shade of a tree in the summer months. In the winter months those fish will stage in deeper holes. These holes will be the deepest, largest bodies of water and tend to have the least amount or most drastic change during colder weather. As the temperatures rise in the spring those bass will move to feed more freely and start looking for places to spawn. The upper and lower ends of the holes can be depended upon for holding these fish as water conditions allow. Once spring has arrived in The Ozark’s and water temps stabilize fish will be consistently found in these holes.
There are more than a few objectives about reading the water and they concern bass behavior, variables of the river or stream and the weather. I am only touching on the basics.

Reading The Breaks
You need to identify a break in the river’s current as it generally is a holding area for fish. Smallmouth and largemouth are ambushers, they usually sit in the current break to conserve energy. Anything that breaks the current be it a log or a bridge pier is a resting place for these ambushers.

Shade
This is an absolute must for predators, they want to lurk in darkness and then pounce on the prey. Find the deepest, darkest places on the river and you’ll find dinner. Throw in a current break and you have it made in the shade. An oxygenated area where their food source is being washed into them can be excellent and you can, at times, sit there all day.

Casting
Perfect your skills, learn to cast on a dime and remember not to spook the fish. Throw beyond the target area and bring it back to the spot. Let it wash into the hole and hang on.

 

And perhaps the most important thing you can do is to take a kid fishing. Practice catch and release and teach them to respect the Ozarks outdoors.

 

It’s Go Time!

28 Feb

Photo provided by Longboat Outfitters - The Open Day Alternative!

The whistle blows for many of Missouri’s trout fishermen starting tomorrow.  It signals that spring is around the corner, and that is as welcome as the flowers in May.  It also signals that the walleye and white bass will be upriver soon.

The trout parks were closed for a couple of weeks before tomorrows March 1 trout “opener”.  I bet they figured they needed to stock a few more trout than they anticipated. They are estimating 8,000 or more anglers to be on hand at the Missouri Trout Parks.

The good part is all that insanity will have most of Missouri’s trout freaks shoulder to shoulder in one area.  I can’t begin to tell you how happy it makes me feel to roll through Roaring River and to see the lunacy, and then to leave it all behind as I head down to Beaver Creek to the quiet spaces left by all those folks trout fishing. Hey, I love to fish for trout .  I will even wet a line in the busiest hole on the river  if I have someone twist my arm.  I might even like it. When I go to the parks, I expect a bit of chit chat,  but some of it can be a bit disturbing.  The parks are enjoyable and entertaining during opening day.  You don’t see them like that most of the year and for some vendors it basically makes their month.  I understand why some people love opening day.  There are some huge trout in there and it’s an Ozarks tradition that is many years in the making. I would imagine by the time this article is read by most of you there will be some nutjob standing in the river staking out his spot.

I hope you all have a great time this year at the parks, when the whistle blows leave old Beaver Creek for me.  I’ll bet Kyle will be headed down to the Current, that is if… I were a gambling man. Good luck old boys!

Three of Missouri’s trout parks–Bennett Spring, Montauk, and Roaring River–are owned by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Maramec Spring Park is owned by the James Foundation. The Conservation Department operates trout hatcheries at all four. For more information about trout-park fishing, call:
• Bennett Spring – 417-532-4418.
• Maramec – 573-265-7801.
• Montauk – 573-548-2585.
• Roaring River – 417-847-2430.

Anglers need a daily trout tag to fish in Missouri’s trout parks. Missouri residents 16 through 64 need a fishing permit in addition to the daily tag. Nonresidents 16 and older also need a fishing permit.
One new feature at all four parks this year is the availability of wader-wash stations. These are baths with a 5-percent salt solution for boots and fishing gear. They are designed to kill the aquatic invasive species, Didymosphenia geminata. commonly known as Didymo. It’s less appetizing nickname, “rock snot,” captures its slimy experience and general undesirability.

Didymo is an invasive alga that forms dense mats on stream bottoms. It can become so thick that it disrupts natural food chains, making fishing impossible. Its arrival in trout streams around the globe probably is the result of its ability to cling to the porous surface of felt-soled fishing waders. Didymo is known to infest streams in 19 states. The infested stream nearest to Missouri is in northern Arkansas.

“We strongly encourage anglers to make use of the wader-wash stations to clean not only waders, but any fishing equipment that has been used in other states,” said MDC Hatchery Systems Manager James Civiello. “Anglers can unknowingly spread the microscopic alga on fishing gear, waders, and especially in any porous materials on wader soles.”

Civiello said anglers can help prevent the spread of rock snot by cleaning fishing gear and waders and drying them in the sun for 48 hours when moving between waters. They also can help by replacing felt-soled waders with rubber-soled ones.

Trout parks are only one option for Show-Me State anglers. For more about the state’s extensive system of trout streams and winter trout fishing, visit www.mdc.mo.gov/7248.

MDC also maintains rainbow and brown trout populations in 120 miles of 17 streams designated as blue-, red- or white-ribbon trout waters. Lake Taneycomo has world-class trophy trout fishing, and MDC stocks trout in selected lakes and ponds in several communities around the state during the winter months. You can find details about all these trout-fishing opportunities in the Summary of Missouri Fishing Regulations, which is available wherever fishing permits are sold or at http://bit.ly/g8carJ. Information about winter trout fishing in urban areas is available at http://bit.ly/gSLEyx.

A Trout Permit ($7 for adults, $3.50 for anglers under age 16) is required to possess trout on waters outside trout parks. A fishing permit also is required, unless the angler is exempt.

Septic Care and The James River

20 Feb

Provide by The James River Basin Partnership – Video describes several different types of septic systems and their maintenance requirements. Produced by James River Basin Partnership, Table Rock Lake Water Quality, INC, and Watershed Committee of the Ozarks. Funds provided by TRLWQ 319 Grant.