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Woman Could Be Jailed For Vegetable Garden

9 Jul

Posted: 7/8/11 05:05 PM ET

Julie Bass, of Oak Park, Michigan, wanted to grow her own food. She was a fan of organic vegetables, so she decided to convert her front yard from the grass-and-tree landscaping typical in her neighborhood into an edible garden. Because she had just torn up the front lawn to install a new sewer system, she had a perfect opportunity to start fresh. She planted cabbage, carrots, tomatoes, cucumbers and herbs in raised wooden planters, and waited to reap her produce.

A neighbor didn’t like her choice of landscaping.

The neighbor called the city and complained that Bass’s yard disrupted the look of the neighborhood. The city agreed, and issued Bass a ticket. (more)

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10,000 Garden Challenge is headed to Springfield, Mo

25 May

The 10,000 Garden Challenge is headed to Springfield, Mo. The Missouri Department of Agriculture will visit the “A Tribute to the Red, White & Blue: A Patriotic Flower Show” event, Friday, May 27 to register gardens, share gardening advice and encourage Missourians to participate in the Challenge.

The 10,000 Garden Challenge is an initiative to register 10,000 Missouri gardens to promote agriculture, gardening, health and nutrition. Department staff will be at the Library Center in Springfield, Mo. from noon to 8:30 p.m. to add to the more than 3,100 gardens already registered at AgriMissouri.com.

On March 14, Governor Nixon, the First Lady, and Director Jon Hagler of the Missouri Department of Agriculture challenged Missourians to register 10,000 gardens in the state of Missouri and put them on a map to promote gardening, health and nutrition throughout the state.

In The Ozarks Tomorrow

20 May

The Master Gardeners of Greene County are hosting a free gardening event for kids Saturday. 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at Springfield-Greene County Botanical Center at Nathanael Greene|Close Memorial Park, 2400 S. Scenic in Springfield. Organizers say the event will take place rain or shine.

The 5th Annual Springfield Missouri Indian Artifact Show is scheduled for Saturday at Remington’s Event Center at 1655 W Republic in Springfield. It starts at 8:00 a.m. and ends at 5:00 p.m. Collectors from eight states will present authentic artifacts for sale and display. An artifact authenticator will be in attendance to help you with your finds.

Home Grown Festival and House Tour This Weekend – in Old North St. Louis

13 May

Be prepared to be inspired at the “Old North St. Louis Home Grown Festival and House Tour” Saturday, May 14, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There is so much to enjoy about the redevelopment of Old North St. Louis. And AgriMissouri will be there to help celebrate every bit of it.

Just this year the community-based revitalization efforts of ONSL led to St. Louis’ first co-op grocery store, the re-opening of Crown Square, recognition by the National Historic Trust for Preservation, Habitat for Humanity’s completion of 17 new LEED platinum homes and the development of the 13th Street Garden. The self-guided tour allows visitors to visit homes and gardens and witness some of the dramatic changes of the neighborhood at their own pace. A free shuttle service will also be provided.

Tickets are available online and on the day of the event. Included in the tour booklet is a coupon for free ice cream from Crown Candy, an Old North Saint Louis landmark since 1913. For more information go www.onsl.org. To learn more about AgriMissouri, head to AgriMissouri.com.

Download Old North flyer here. pdf

1000 Gardens – Make space for berries.

31 Mar

In Missouri The 1,000 Gardens Project gets people to register their vegetable gardens. It’s hoping to sprout 10,000 new gardens in 2011.

Locally it’s relying on the community to get things started. The idea behind the push is sustainability. “I think if you looked at the number that are actually exploring this issue, you’d be very surprised. I think this is a very attainable goal,” said Shelley Vaugine, a volunteer. Organizers say local gardens would make Springfield less dependent on store bought food, and I’m sure it would. People in the Ozarks are known for their resourcefulness and their ability to get things to grow in spite of all the rocks. Back at the turn of the century tomato canneries were commonplace in these hills. Everything seems to be going full circle here as the community as a whole supports not only themselves, but the growers in our area through the multiple farmers markets.

We plant everything from pole beans to tomatoes. In our garden we have set aside an area for blackberries and raspberries. We like to make jelly and sauces and those berries really pay for themselves over the season. If you haven’t tried growing berries here’s a source we use that’s Missouri based and provides the right planets for our area. Stark Bros. out of Louisiana, MO sends us Thornless Boysenberries which are great juicy deep purple berries – just wade in and pick ’em! Berries grow to a whopping 1½ inches long and as big around as one full inch! You’ll want them for dessert every day during the season, but save a few for the greatest jam you ever tasted. Usually ready late July. We also have Natchez Thornless Blackberries as big as your thumb that are disease-resistant and one that the University of Arkansas has helped produce. The berries we have are much like the monsters you sometimes find at your local farmers market…you know the ones that look like a purple baseball. All kidding aside, it’s a pleasure to have the canes included in our garden space, no thorns and the benefit of the berries, how can you lose?

I think we can all agree sustainability should include a few choice berries. They should be in the mix. Our friends at Stark Bros. have graciously given Hootentown readers their own discounted coupon if you want to plant some berries in your garden.

COUPON Code: HOOTENTOWN
Valid: April 1, 2011 – April 30, 2011
$5 Off all orders over $50 (prior to S/H).
Online (www.starkbros.com) use only
1 use per customer

P.S. Don’t forget the fertilizer!

Blackberry & Bramble Fertilizer

Finally…a fertilizer that is formulated especially for blackberries. Easy to use 12-10-10 formula is developed to give your blackberries and other brambles the perfect nutrients needed for strong growth and high yields of large, healthy berries.

New Gardening Classes in 2011

10 Mar

University of Missouri Extension Master Gardeners will partner with Springfield-Greene County Park Board locations, Rutledge-Wilson Farm Community Park, 3825 W. Farm Road 146, and Springfield-Greene County Botanical Center, 2400 S. Scenic, to offer several new classes that will enhance gardening knowledge and skills.

The Farm Park series is titled “Growing Knowledge at the Farm.”All classes are held from 6 – 7 p.m. on Thursdays. Pre-registration is required at 417-837-5949.
Series topics include:

* March 17: Discover the Benefits of Grafting ($15)
* April 28: Growing Tomatoes ($5)
* May 19: Meet The Three Sisters ($5)
* June 16: Manage Insects and Diseases in Your Garden ($5)
* July 21: Plan Now for a Fall Harvest ($5)

Botanical Center’s classes are titled “Into Gardening Series.” All classes are held from 9 – 11 a.m. on Saturdays. Pre-registration is required at 417-891-1515 and each session has a fee of $10.
Series topics include:

* May 7: Spring Into Gardening
* October 8: Fall Into Gardening
* January 21, 2012: Getting Beyond the Garden

Registration for both locations and series can also be made online at www.swmogardens.com/fogcalendar.

The Earth 2050

21 Feb

According to a report out of Washington, DC, earth will need to produce as much food in the next 40 years as it has in the past 8,000. The director of the Initiative in Population Research at Ohio State University, John Casterline, said the planet’s swelling population will stretch resources well beyond existing abilities.

Specifically, the United Nations predicts that this year the earth’s population will rise to 7 billion. And, by 2050, the population is likely to be about 9 billion, with much of the new population arising in Africa and Southern Asia. Consequently, population experts are calling for more finding for family planning to help control population growth, especially in developing nations.

The swelling population will exacerbate problems, such as resource depletion, said John Casterline, director of the Initiative in Population Research at Ohio State University.

But incomes are also expected to rise over the next 40 years — tripling globally and quintupling in developing nations — and add more strain to global food supplies.

People tend to move up the food chain as their incomes rise, consuming more meat than they might have when they made less money, the experts said.

It takes around seven pounds (3.4 kilograms) of grain to produce a pound of meat, and around three to four pounds of grain to produce a pound of cheese or eggs, experts told AFP.

“More people, more money, more consumption, but the same planet,” Clay told AFP, urging scientists and governments to start making changes now to how food is produced.

Population experts, meanwhile, called for more funding for family planning programs to help control the growth in the number of humans, especially in developing nations.

“For 20 years, there’s been very little investment in family planning, but there’s a return of interest now, partly because of the environmental factors like global warming and food prices,” said Bongaarts.

“We want to minimize population growth, and the only viable way to do that is through more effective family planning,” said Casterline.

Source http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20110220/ts_afp/scienceuspopulationfood

In a related story…
The extreme freezing temperatures that hit swept across the country over the last few weeks may cause a huge increase in food prices over the coming months.

Farmers across Northern Mexico and the Southwestern United States have been hit with gigantic crop losses. An estimated 80 to 100% of Northern Mexico’s Food Crops have been destroyed by cold weather.

Mexico supplies a considerable amount of our crop vegetables and this loss will defiantly have an impact on prices. Sysco, one of the largest grocery suppliers in the country, is already having a hard time keeping up with demand and has issued a force majeure telling its buyers that price increases are on the way.

To make matters worse, Florida which is also a major grower of these types of crops had huge losses due to the extreme weather last month. Up until a couple weeks ago Florida was actually importing much of its supply from Mexico.

Watch for a spike in things like tomatoes, green beans, cucumbers, squash, asparagus and peppers.